Thilafushi Springs

February, 2018

Our brief asked us to create a waste management centre on a Maldivian island in an attempt to combat the rising issue of waste. In response to this, I wanted to encourage those who visited my intervention to interact with waste in different ways. In this effort I wanted to inspire new ways of thinking about waste.

.
fig. 1 Site visit to Thilafushi (Maldive’s landfill island)

.
Visiting Thilafushi, a rubbish dump landfill island in the Maldives, had a profound impact on me. Following this visit I felt that my design would be most effective on this island, a device which would encourage people to see the result of what was thrown away. And so, this hot, dusty, fly infested, rotting pile of waste became the setting for my piece. The final proposal was for an interactive waste park which took visitors in, on, through and around the waste, finally taking them to a tower at its core. This tower not only gave visitors an aerial perspective view of the site but also introduced clean water. The tower’s core acted as a distillery, utilizing the heat from the environment and the burning pile of waste at it’s base to distill sea water which then fed a large pool following the perimeter of the top deck. This aspect of the design not only added
a cleansing factor and different views of the waste in composite with clean water; but also encouraged change to the island in order to unlock the potential of a hot springs on a Maldivian Island.

.
fig. 2 Concept sketch illustrating how the intervention encourages interacting with waste at varying scales, broadcasting this experience to incite change.

.
fig. 3 Thilafushi Springs tower model

.
fig. 4 Thilafushi Springs tower model

.
fig. 5 Thilafushi Springs tower model, top deck with perimeter distilled water pool.

.
fig. 6 Thilafushi Springs tower model, entrance gangway and spiral staircase to upper deck.

.
fig. 7 Thilafushi Springs tower drawn visualization

.
fig. 8 Thilafushi Springs tower technical sections

.

This project not only inspired individual designs, like the Thilafushi Springs, but also ignited a group effort. When the brief was originally set, a group of students came together to spread the word about this issue of waste on the Maldives. This generated interest from the press and gained support from external companies who helped to fund an excursion to the Maldives. As part of this group I lead the PR team which worked to create and manage the content that the group created (for more information see the video below).

.

.